Mar 30, 2016

By Beth Walsh, Originally posted on Clinical Innovation

GE and Santa Clara University’s Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship have established a partnership that combines Silicon Valley entrepreneurship with venture impact investing to address maternal and child health.  

The partnership will focus on a training and mentoring program for social entrepreneurs working on maternal and child health innovations in sub-Saharan Africa. The program enables more women to experience better health by improving the quality, access and affordability of care.  

 

The partnership objectives support key elements of ‘Good Health and Well-being’, which is No. 3 of the 17 “Sustainable Development Goals” set by the United Nations, and focuses on the reduction of the global maternal mortality ratio and ending preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age. 

 

The healthymagination Mother & Child program will help social enterprises operating in sub-Saharan Africa addressing maternal and/or child health strengthen their business models, refine business plans, reinforce organizational development, manage talent and learn how to scale sustainably. The program is being offered to 15-to-20 selected participants. 

 

“This program supports GE’s long track record in developing innovations for emerging markets while increasing positive health outcomes,” said Sue Siegel, CEO, GE Ventures and healthymagination. “We are excited to join Miller Center to accelerate the growth of social enterprises and commercialize innovative ideas while serving as a resource for entrepreneurs working to improve access, affordability and quality of maternal and child health in sub-Saharan Africa.”

 

The healthymagination Mother & Child program utilizes Miller Center’s Global Social Benefit Institute methodology, which has been proven and refined over 12 years of helping accelerate more than 560 social enterprises worldwide.

 

“We share GE’s healthymagination vision for innovating new ways to address global health challenges,” said Thane Kreiner, PhD, executive director, Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship.